LADY OSCAR
1979, Ciné Tamaris, 124 min, Japan/France, Dir: Jacques Demy

Adapted by director Jacques Demy and writer Patricia Knop from the Japanese manga The Rose of Versailles, this drama centers on an aristocratic young woman brought up as a man just prior to the French Revolution. With a father who’d hoped for a male heir, Oscar François de Jarjayes (Catriona MacColl) is raised to follow his footsteps in a military career; when she is eventually appointed to lead the Royal Guard, Lady Oscar enters the secluded and decadent court at Versailles. But as the plight of the common people deepens and popular tensions flare, she finds herself torn between a sense of duty and a young love committed to the cause of change (Barry Stokes). Quintessentially Demy in its aesthetics and subject matter, LADY OSCAR features lavish visuals and a score by the director’s longtime collaborator, Michel Legrand.


THE MAN WHO KILLED DON QUIXOTE
2018, Screen Media Films, 132 min, Dir: Terry Gilliam

Toby (Adam Driver), a cynical advertising director, finds himself trapped in the outrageous delusions of an old Spanish shoemaker (Jonathan Pryce) who believes himself to be Don Quixote. In the course of their comic and increasingly surreal adventures, Toby is forced to confront the tragic repercussions of a film he made in his idealistic youth - a film that changed the hopes and dreams of a small Spanish village forever. Can Toby make amends and regain his humanity? Can Don Quixote survive his madness and imminent death? Or will love conquer all?


PRIMAL FEAR
1996, Paramount, 129 min, USA, Dir: Gregory Hoblit

In this glossy legal thriller, a hot-shot lawyer (Richard Gere) chooses to defend a young man (Edward Norton, in his Oscar-nominated feature debut) accused of murdering an archbishop. But closer examination of the facts reveals dark secrets about the archbishop and the boy’s past. The top-flight supporting cast includes Laura Linney, John Mahoney, Alfre Woodard and Frances McDormand. “The plot is as good as crime procedurals get, but the movie is really better than its plot because of the three-dimensional characters.” - Roger Ebert, Chicago Sun-Times.


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