SATURDAY NIGHT FEVER
1977, Paramount, 119 min, USA, Dir: John Badham

Plucked from the cast of the ensemble high-school sitcom “Welcome Back Kotter” for his first starring film role, this is the movie that made John Travolta a movie star and confirmed that the man can DANCE! Director John Badham, better known for action and war movies, here captures the connection between great dance music and the body. The story of a Brooklyn youth stuck in a working-class job, who finds that being king of the dance floor during the late-’70s disco craze might be his ticket to bigger things, SATURDAY NIGHT FEVER has it all: big hair, white polyester suits and the quintessential Bee Gees soundtrack.


JOE (1970)
1970, Park Circus/MGM, 107 min, USA, Dir: John G. Avildsen

A low-budget indie film shot over a month and a half in the winter of 1970, JOE traces the adversarial relationship between a white-collar father (Dennis Patrick) and his hippie daughter (a debuting Susan Sarandon). After a confrontation with her grungy partner (Patrick McDermott), the traumatized patriarch winds up at a bar, where he befriends working-class Joe (Peter Boyle), who is a fount of caustic barbs against the counterculture. The pair bond and set out on an odyssey that concludes in nightmarish carnage at a rural commune. Re-editing the film around Boyle's performance and even releasing a soundtrack album devoted to his diatribes, original distributor Cannon not only made JOE box-office gold, but turned Boyle himself into a star.


Syndicate content