THE TIN DRUM
Die Blechtrommel
1979, Janus Films, 163 min, Dir: Volker Schlöndorff

Adapted from the acclaimed Günter Grass novel, this Best Foreign-Language Film Oscar winner stars David Bennent as Oskar Matzerath, a boy whose refusal to grow up makes this one of the most bizarre coming-of-age film ever. Born near the Polish-German border in the 1920s, Oskar has a ringside seat to the rise of Nazism, and uses his tin drum and glass-shattering voice to display his disgust with the adult world. An unforgettable film (including at least a couple of sequences that will make you squirm).


THE PHANTOM OF LIBERTY
LE FANTÔME DE LA LIBERTÉ
1974, Rialto Pictures, 104 min, France/Italy, Dir: Luis Buñuel

Surreal even by Buñuel standards, this loosely connected series of Monty Pythonesque sketches thumbs its nose at the conventions of storytelling as well as those of bourgeois society. Buñuel and co-writer Jean-Claude Carrière dream up dirty pictures of French architecture, poker-playing monks, celebrity snipers, fox-hunting tanks and more, setting the table for a banquet of free-wheeling satire. In French with English subtitles.


THAT OBSCURE OBJECT OF DESIRE
CET OBSCUR OBJET DU DÉSIR
1977, Rialto Pictures, 102 min, France, Spain, Dir: Luis Buñuel

The acclaimed final film from director Luis Buñuel stars Fernando Rey as a wealthy older man who fruitlessly pursues a beautiful dancer (played by both Carole Bouquet and Angela Molina) during a terrorist insurgency. In French and Spanish with English subtitles.


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