THINNER
1996, Paramount, 93 min, USA, Dir: Tom Holland

In this creepy adaptation of the Stephen King novel, obese lawyer Billy Halleck (Robert John Burke) gets off scot-free after running over and killing a gypsy woman, whose father (Michael Constantine) then puts a curse on him. When Halleck begins to lose weight uncontrollably, he asks a mob boss client (Joe Mantegna, thoroughly menacing) to persuade the gypsy patriarch to lift the curse. For his work helping the central character shed the pounds, make-up artist Greg Cannom earned a well-deserved Saturn nomination.


CREEPSHOW
1982, Warner Bros., 120 min, USA, Dir: George Romero

There hadn’t been a lot of anthology movies when the George Romero/Stephen King collaboration CREEPSHOW, a film inspired by classic EC horror comics, debuted in 1982; in comparison to the sober, big-budget thrills of POLTERGEIST and THE THING, the Romero/King effort was a refreshing blast of B-movie fun, low on budget and ambition but with a surprisingly good cast: Hal Holbrook, E.G. Marshall, Ted Danson, Leslie Nielsen, Ed Harris, Fritz Weaver and King himself. "The Lonesome Death of Jordy Verrill," the segment with King (as an incredibly stupid farmer), is probably the most memorable even though it’s a short vignette compared with the others - it’s a deft takeoff of THE BLOB and a riff on those moronic victims in ’50s sci-fi movies who always want to be first in line to check out that strange light coming from over the next rise.


MARTIN
1977, Lionsgate, 95 min, Dir: George A. Romero

This tale of a young man who may or may not be a 100-year-old vampire, seeking redemption for his bloodlust, is both sympathetic and horrific thanks to John Amplas’ performance as the title character. Is he really a vampire or a mentally disturbed killer?


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