DOWNSIZING
2017, Paramount, 135 min, USA, Dir: Alexander Payne

This sci-fi satire imagines what might happen if, as a solution to over-population, Norwegian scientists discover how to shrink humans to five inches tall and propose a 200-year global transition from big to small. People soon realize how much further money goes in a miniaturized world. With the promise of a better life, everyman Paul Safranek (Matt Damon) and wife Audrey (Kristen Wiig) decide to abandon their stressed lives in Omaha for a new downsized community, taking the irreversible leap that will trigger life-changing adventures when they become small.


DETROIT
2017, Annapurna Distribution, 143 min, USA, Dir: Kathryn Bigelow

From director Kathryn Bigelow, and screenwriter Mark Boal, DETROIT is the dramatic true story of a racially motivated crime that took place over one dark night in 1967. Up-and-coming Motown musician Larry Reed (Algee Smith), six other young African American men and two young white women were terrorized by local police, despite the presence of the State Police, the National Guard and an African American security guard (John Boyega). Before the sun rose in the motor city, three of the young males were slain in cold blood. Set against the civil unrest of '67, DETROIT charts the crime and the survivors’ futile search for justice. Heartbreakingly, Larry Reed's dreams of stardom disappear as he struggles to find a way forward.


THE BAD BATCH
2016, Netflix, 115 min, Dir: Ana Lily Amirpour

Complete with stellar cast, electrifying visuals and a score to die for, director Ana Lily Amirpour has created a film that is as uncategorizable as her acclaimed debut, A GIRL WALKS HOME ALONE AT NIGHT. Set in a hostile desert, THE BAD BATCH focuses its lens on Arlen (Suki Waterhouse) as she is unceremoniously dumped in a dystopian wasteland fenced off from civilized society. While making her way through this unforgiving environment, she is captured by a savage band of cannibals and quickly realizes she'll have to fight to live. As Arlen adjusts to life in "the bad batch," she discovers that being good or bad often depends on who you're standing next to.


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