NAKED LUNCH
1991, 20th Century Fox, 115 min, Canada/UK/Japan, Dir: David Cronenberg

Once more, director David Cronenberg films the un-filmable with this adaptation from one of his key literary influences, William Burroughs. Peter Weller is Bill Lee, a frustrated writer and bug exterminator who is introduced to the narcotic effects of bug poison by his wife (Judy Davis) in the 1950s. After accidentally shooting her and pursued by the drug squad, Lee finds himself traversing the strange Middle Eastern city Interzone, where all manner of half-human and polysexual creatures dwell. With Roy Scheider, Julian Sands and Ian Holm. "[P]erhaps one of the most penetrating examinations of a writer's processes ever made. Certainly it's one of the strangest and most disturbing." – Hal Hinson, Washington Post.


TALE OF TALES
IL RACCONTO DEI RACCONTI
2015, IFC Films, 125 min, Dir: Matteo Garrone

Acclaimed director Matteo Garrone (GOMORRAH) makes his English-language debut with this fantasy-horror anthology film, which takes the classic PENTAMERONE collection of fairy tales as its source. An international cast including Salma Hayek, John C. Reilly, Vincent Cassel and Toby Jones stars in a trio of stylish fables exploring love, desire and obsession.


THE GREAT ROCK ’N’ ROLL SWINDLE
1980, Virgin Films, 103 min, UK, Dir: Julien Temple

“To be bad is good. To be good is simply boring.” - Malcolm McLaren. The urge to self-mythologize is written into rock's DNA and in 1978 the Sex Pistols story - who did what for whom, and why - was still up for grabs. THE GREAT ROCK ’N’ ROLL SWINDLE is manager Malcolm McLaren's attempt to write himself into history as the band's creator, manipulator and ideologue, and to steal back from the music industry what he felt it had stolen from rock & roll. Julien Temple's bizarre and hilarious fictional documentary charts the rise and fall of punk's most notorious band through the eyes of its calculating manager. Mixing animation and live footage of some of the Pistols' most electrifying performances, the film presents the band's success as an elaborate scam perpetrated by McLaren to make "a million pounds" at the expense of record companies, outraged moralists, the British royal family, and even the fans and band members themselves.


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