THE CAINE MUTINY
1954, Sony Repertory, 124 min, USA, Dir: Edward Dmytryk

A superb ensemble cast, including Humphrey Bogart, Jose Ferrer, Fred MacMurray and Van Johnson, leads this classic adaptation of Herman Wouk's novel. Bogart is Captain Queeg, a paranoid authoritarian whose men (led by Johnson and MacMurray) stage a mutiny in the last days of WWII. Ferrer is the brilliant military lawyer who takes on the case once the ship returns to port. Lee Marvin is on hand as a crewman and E.G. Marshall is a withering prosecutor at the court-martial.


THE BREAKING POINT
1950, Warner Bros., 97 min, USA, Dir: Michael Curtiz

The finest film version of Hemingway’s novel To Have and Have Not (and yes, that includes the Bogart-Hawks classic) shifts the story from Cuba to Newport Beach, California, but retains the novel’s core of noir-stained tragedy. As Skipper Harry Morgan, John Garfield essays his finest screen portrayal of a man whose domestic travails and mid-life crisis results in crime, flight and death. Garfield’s turn is perfectly matched by Patricia Neal, as a predatory femme fatale, and Phyllis Thaxter as his beaten-down but unswervingly loyal spouse. With Wallace Ford as a bottom-feeding attorney and the great Afro-Cuban actor Juano Hernandez.


A STAR IS BORN (1937)
1937, Warner Bros., 111 min, USA, Dir: William A. Wellman

The first version of this twice-remade drama about the price of fame features Janet Gaynor as a Hollywood hopeful whose star rises while that of the alcoholic actor she loves (Fredric March) falls. An Oscar winner for best original story and an honorary Oscar winner for its beautiful Technicolor cinematography.


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