SLAP SHOT
1977, Universal, 122 min, USA, Dir: George Roy Hill

Director George Roy Hill (BUTCH CASSIDY AND THE SUNDANCE KID) and writer Nancy Dowd (Best Screenplay winner for COMING HOME) bring to the screen this incredibly funny and foul-mouthed saga of a has-been hockey team from a dying-on-the-vine Pennsylvania town. Paul Newman is both the team’s coach and a player who strives for a winning strategy. When an atypical fit of violence erupts in the rink, it creates a surprising spike in the team’s popularity, and Newman suddenly has a guaranteed approach to bring in the fans. Co-starring Michael Ontkean as a fish-out-of-water Ivy League player disgruntled by the bad sportsmanship, Strother Martin as the team’s manager, Jerry Houser as Dave “Killer” Carlson and Jennifer Warren as Newman’s long-suffering beautician wife. Reportedly Newman’s favorite of his films. "Easily the greatest hockey film ever made. …Paul Newman stars as the coach/player for a second-rate team who can't win and can't even get arrested until they hire three brothers with Coke-bottle glasses named the Hansons. These three violent goons begin beating other players to a pulp in every game, not only drawing attention to the team but beginning a winning streak. …Irreverent and very funny." - Jeffrey M. Anderson, combustiblecelluloid.com


SLAUGHTERHOUSE-FIVE
1972, Universal, 104 min, USA, Dir: George Roy Hill

Director George Roy Hill and screenwriter Stephen Geller (TV’s "Mission: Impossible") adapt Kurt Vonnegut’s sardonic exploration of the timeless madness of human existence, from wartime atrocity to middle-class mediocrity to interplanetary euphoria. Middle-aged optometrist Billy Pilgrim (Michael Sacks) simultaneously exists in the past as a young POW in a German prison camp and in the far future as an elderly resident in a zoo on the planet Tralfamadore (where he is memorably pampered by Valerie Perrine as the libidinous starlet Montana Wildhack).


AMERICA, AMERICA
1963, Warner Bros., 174 min, USA, Dir: Elia Kazan

This sprawling epic about a young Greek, Stavros (based on Kazan’s uncle), living with his family in Turkey circa 1900 and obsessed with emigrating to America, is one of Kazan’s most moving, personal films. Kazan molds a talented cast of relatively unknown performers into a powerhouse ensemble: Stathis Giallelis is perfect as Stavros, with able support from John Marley, Lou Antonio, Joanna Frank and the underrated yet terrific Frank Wolff. Be sure to catch this masterpiece on the big screen. "May be Kazan’s most accomplished work." - Time Out New York


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