NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN
2007, Park Circus/Miramax, 122 min, USA, Dir: Ethan Coen, Joel Coen

A mesmerizing thriller from Academy Award-winning filmmakers Joel and Ethan Coen, based on the acclaimed novel by Pulitzer Prize winning American master Cormac McCarthy. The time is our own, when rustlers have given way to drug-runners and small towns have become free-fire zones. When Llewelyn Moss (Josh Brolin) finds a pickup truck surrounded by a sentry of dead men with a load of heroin and two million dollars in cash still in the back, a chain reaction of catastrophic violence begins that not even the law–in the person of aging, disillusioned Sheriff Bell (Tommy Lee Jones) – can contain. As Moss tries to evade his pursuers–in particular a mysterious mastermind who flips coins for human lives (Javier Bardem) – the film simultaneously strips down the American crime drama and broadens its concerns to encompass themes as ancient as the Bible and as bloodily contemporary as this morning’s headline.


BUFFY THE VAMPIRE SLAYER
1992, 20th Century Fox, 86 min, USA, Dir: Fran Rubel Kuzui

Writer Joss Whedon would bring Buffy and friends to television with even greater success five years later but this big-screen original remains loads of fun. Spoiled L.A. teen Buffy Summers (Kristy Swanson) is skeptical when an older man named Merrick (Donald Sutherland) tells her that she’s destined to kill the undead, but when vampire leader Lothos (Rutger Hauer) and his deputy (Paul Reubens, in a very effective turn from his Pee-wee Herman persona) cross her path, Buffy goes into action. Luke Perry costars as her eventual ally, with an impressive array of future stars (including Hilary Swank and an uncredited Ben Affleck) joining them in the halls of Hemery High School.


BEING JOHN MALKOVICH
1999, Universal, 112 min, USA, Dir: Spike Jonze

Director Spike Jonze and writer Charlie Kaufman made their feature debuts - and earned Oscar nominations - with this surreal fantasy. When puppeteer Craig Schwartz (John Cusack) gets a job at the strange LesterCorp, he discovers a secret portal leading into the mind of John Malkovich. When Schwartz’s wife (Cameron Diaz) and co-worker (Catherine Keener) learn of this, they begin using the actor to advance their own agendas.


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