L’AGE D’OR
1930, Kino International, 60 min, France, Dir: Luis Buñuel

Wonderfully bizarre and spun together with the allusive dictates of dream logic, the second collaboration between Luis Buñuel and Salvador Dalí is a series of gleefully irreverent vignettes, the most sustained of which centers on Gaston Modot and Lya Lys, lovers attempting to consummate their passion but continuously stalled by some of Buñuel’s favorite fixations - the church and the bourgeoisie! Featuring an infamous sequence in which Lys fellates the toe of a religious statue, L’AGE D’OR was banned from distribution for nearly 50 years after its initial release in 1930. With Surrealism co-founder Max Ernst. In French with English subtitles.


THE DISCREET CHARM OF THE BOURGEOISIE
1972, Rialto Pictures, 102 min, France, Dir: Luis Buñuel

This later Luis Buñuel masterpiece and 1973 Best Foreign-Language Oscar winner is a return to the subversive director’s Surrealist roots and a showcase for his scrumptiously satirical wit. A sextet of upper-class friends (including Fernando Rey, Stéphane Audran, Delphine Seyrig and Jean-Pierre Cassel) attempt to dine together but are continually stalled by a streaming series of vaudevillian events, both real and dreamed. In French and Spanish with English subtitles.


SPELLBOUND
1945, Walt Disney Co., 111 min, USA, Dir: Alfred Hitchcock

When bespectacled psychiatrist Ingrid Bergman discovers Gregory Peck is not the famous visiting shrink, Dr. Edwardes but a traumatized amnesiac, she suddenly realizes she’s in love with him. But is Peck a victim of circumstance or the missing doctor’s killer? Director Alfred Hitchcock tackles Freudian territory as well as repressed memories (ably abetted by Surrealist Salvador Dali, who designed the startling dream sequence) and seamlessly blends the elements into a romantic and suspenseful spellbinder.


Syndicate content