THE DARK SIDE OF TOMORROW
1970, Valiant International Pictures, 84 min, USA, Dir: Jack Deerson, Barbara Peeters

With their husbands out of town on business, Denise and Adria, two bored and lonely housewives living in a planned community in Chatsworth, go out for a day on the town, only to stumble upon a young lesbian couple. Igniting Adria’s curiosity and Denise’s long-repressed urges, the two friends begin a secret affair, which is soon threatened by a chance meeting with two attractive young men - who Denise fears will take away her new lover. Co-directed by Barbara Peeters (HUMANOIDS FROM THE DEEP) and cinematographer Jacques Deerson (TWO LANE BLACKTOP), THE DARK SIDE OF TOMORROW (aka JUST THE TWO OF US) is a low-key and clearly personal examination of sexual awakening, fear and repression. Set against the swinging hippie culture of early-’70s L.A., the film is a valuable portrait of lesbian love as part of the American experience.


THE PETRIFIED FOREST
1936, Warner Bros., 83 min, USA, Dir: Archie Mayo

Based on the Robert E. Sherwood play, this hard-edged drama stars Humphrey Bogart, Bette Davis and Leslie Howard as strangers whose lives collide with deadly results in a small desert town on the edge of Arizona’s petrified forest. Disillusioned British intellectual Alan Squier (Howard) meets young Gabby Maple (Davis), who sees him as her ticket to Paris and to her dreams. Squier hopes she succeeds but plans to leave alone - a plan that ends abruptly when gangster Duke Mantee (Bogart) takes them hostage.


SABRINA
1954, Paramount, 113 min, USA, Dir: Billy Wilder

Chauffeur's daughter Audrey Hepburn blooms from ugly duckling to a chic young woman who must choose between wealthy, middle-aged Humphrey Bogart and cocky lover-boy William Holden.


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