1948, Sony Repertory, 93 min, USA, Dir: S. Sylvan Simon

Franchot Tone is a wisecracking private eye sleuthing his way through a bevy of treacherous dames in this playful homage to Raymond Chandler, written by future TV legend Roy Huggins (creator of iconic small-screen series such as "77 Sunset Strip," "The Fugitive" and " The Rockford Files"). On-location sequences featuring midcentury Wilshire, Venice and Long Beach abound. Featuring Janet Blair, Janis Carter, Adele Jergens, Glenda Farrell, John Ireland and (of course) Raymond Burr.

1946, Universal, 96 min, USA, Dir: George Marshall

Hard-luck WWII vet Alan Ladd returns to Los Angeles only to become the prime suspect in the murder of his two-timing wife (Doris Dowling). Fortunately, plucky Veronica Lake is around to help him navigate the twists and turns of Raymond Chandler’s Oscar-nominated screenplay. Ladd is accompanied by his faithful dogface pal William Bendix and a pre-Ward Cleaver Hugh Beaumont. An exquisite time capsule of 1940s L.A. hardboiled style, featuring the impeccable wardrobe stylings of Edith Head. Script by Raymond Chandler.

1977, Park Circus/MGM, 118 min, USA/West Germany, Dir: Ingmar Bergman

A large US/West German co-production shot entirely in English with a fascinating mystery at the center of its plot, THE SERPENT’S EGG is an underappreciated anomaly in Bergman’s filmography. Starring David Carradine alongside Bergman regular Liv Ullmann, the film takes place in 1920s Berlin, as Nazi sentiment was beginning to brew just below the surface of German society. While it was originally panned by critics (perhaps due to its significant departure from his other work), the film offers an honest reflection on the director’s early memories of fascism during his time in Germany as a teenager.

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