THE WOMEN
1939, Warner Bros., 133 min, USA, Dir: George Cukor

George Cukor (A STAR IS BORN, MY FAIR LADY) directs Norma Shearer, Joan Crawford, Paulette Goddard and Joan Fontaine in a cast of 135 woman (with nothing on their minds, but men) wearing costumes designed by Adrian! Catch your breath yet? There is a six minute Technicolor fashion sequence too! Forget the plot which is essentially ‘who’s stepping out on who’ and focus on the fact that this movie takes things out of the boudoir and onto the screen in a picture that lets you see these women “with their hair down and their claws out,” and we quote. “I’ve had two years to grow my claws Mother… JUNGLE RED!” The Great Gatsby author F. Scott Fitzgerald worked on the script at some point, but is uncredited. Three female writers, Clare Boothe Luce, Anita Loos & Jane Muffin got the screenplay done!


BRAM STOKER’S DRACULA
1992, Sony Repertory, 128 min, USA, Dir: Francis Ford Coppola

Gary Oldman turns in an iconic performance as the legendary Count Dracula in Francis Ford Coppola's adaptation of Bram Stoker's horror classic, which tells the vampire's story as a love triangle involving the count, young lawyer Jonathan Harker (Keanu Reeves) and Harker's fiancée, Mina (Winona Ryder). Anthony Hopkins co-stars as vampire hunter Van Helsing.


MILDRED PIERCE
1945, Warner Bros., 111 min, USA, Dir: Michael Curtiz

"Mildred had more to offer in a glance than most woman give in a lifetime."

Joan Crawford gives her signature performance (an Oscar winner) as James M. Cain's ultimate maternal martyr, in thrall to her own femme fatale daughter, Veda (a deliciously venal Ann Blyth). After Mildred divorces her cheating husband, she turns her pie baking skills into what ultimately becomes a successful restaurant chain – all the while, working to give her demanding, selfish daughter the best of everything - but even that isn’t enough for Veda! The twisted combination of high-strung soap opera and hard-edged pulp produced what may be the greatest Hollywood melodrama of all time.

"Loving her was like shaking hands with the devil."


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