PUMPKINHEAD
1988, MGM Repertory, 86 min, USA, Dir: Stan Winston

Effects wizard Stan Winston made his directorial debut with this macabre modern folk tale. Lance Henriksen stars as Ed Harley, a grief-stricken father who asks an old witch in the swamp to bring forth a demon from Hell to wreak vengeance on the teen dirt-bike riders who accidentally ran down and killed his tiny son. That vengeance comes at a terrible price, as the link between Ed and the monster grows until the carnage threatens to consume them both.


SPIDER-MAN
2002, Sony Pictures, 121 min, USA, Dir: Sam Raimi

Stan Lee’s conflicted young superhero swings from the pages of Marvel Comics to the big screen in spectacular fashion in this first installment of the Spider-Man franchise. Peter Parker (Tobey Maguire) is just a kid with a crush on girl-next-door Mary Jane (Kirsten Dunst) until a bite from a radioactive spider imbues him with super-strength, acute vision and the ability to climb walls and shoot webs from his wrists. These powers come in handy when Green Goblin (Willem Dafoe), the alter ego of an eccentric millionaire, arrives on the scene. Can Spidey save the city from this super villain, and will he get the girl of his dreams? Director Sam Raimi’s hyperkinetic action sequences pushed the boundaries of special effects and breathed new life into the superhero genre.


THE SEVENTH SEAL
DET SJUNDE INSEGLET
1957, Janus Films, 92 min, Sweden, Dir: Ingmar Bergman

Arguably Ingmar Bergman’s most iconic film and the movie that helped create the international arthouse-cinema craze of the 1950s. While the Black Plague rages all around, medieval knight Max von Sydow plays a game of chess with Death … but who will win? Often imitated and parodied but never equaled, THE SEVENTH SEAL is an astonishing, protean masterpiece: a film to storm the gates of Heaven with. Winner of the Special Jury Prize at Cannes. "Bergman's spiritual quest is at the center of the films he made in the middle of his career. THE SEVENTH SEAL opens that period, in which he asked, again and again, why God seemed absent from the world." - Roger Ebert, Chicago Sun-Times.


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