CREEPSHOW 2
1987, 92 min, USA, Dir: Michael Gornick

CREEPSHOW cinematographer Michael Gornick and director George A. Romero return for the sequel as director and screenwriter, respectively. As with the previous horror anthology, Stephen King stories provide the basis: “Old Chief Wood'nhead” stars George Kennedy and Dorothy Lamour In her final film role) as a couple whose business is guarded by a cigar store Indian, “The Raft” features an oil-like blob with a taste for college students and in “The Hitch-hiker,” Lois Chiles has a fatal run-in with the title character. With horror stalwart Tom Savini as The Creep.


ALWAYS
1989, Universal, 122 min, USA, Dir: Steven Spielberg

Based on the WWII drama A GUY NAMED JOE, this moving fantasy-romance is among director Steven Spielberg’s most underrated films. Warned by girlfriend Holly Hunter and colleague John Goodman that he takes too many risks, aerial firefighter Richard Dreyfuss resolves to take a safer job - but one last mission turns him from a pilot into a guardian angel. Audrey Hepburn costars in her final big-screen appearance.


PROSPERO’S BOOKS
1991, Park Circus/Miramax, 124 min, UK/Netherlands/France, Dir: Peter Greenaway

This highly imaginative retelling of Shakespeare’s The Tempest stars John Gielgud, here realizing a lifelong ambition to portray Prospero on screen. A magician in exile, he is eager to exact revenge against his enemies until his daughter (Isabelle Pasco) falls in love with his chief rival’s son (Mark Rylance). With its remarkably innovative use of choreography (to a Michael Nyman score), animation and digitally manipulated imagery, Greenaway’s riff on the classic play is among his most dazzlingly visual films.


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