1974, Janus Films, 134 min, Sweden, Dir: Ingmar Bergman

Director Ingmar Bergman shot Mozart's last operatic masterpiece for Swedish television in 1973, all on a studio lot in which the famed 18th-century Royal Court Theatre of Drottningholm was re-created. A heroic prince (Josef Köstlinger) has been enlisted by the Queen of the Night (Birgit Nordin) to rescue her daughter, the beautiful Pamina (Irma Urrila), from her evil father, Sarastro (Ulrik Cold). The music is sublime, and the film is stunning to look at with gorgeous cinematography by Bergman favorite Sven Nykvist. “THE MAGIC FLUTE is magical indeed, charming and musically fulfilling, a perfect commingling of one form of art and another.” - Charles Champlin, Los Angeles Times.

1960, Janus Films, 84 min, Sweden, Dir: Ingmar Bergman

This sophisticated fantasy - the last Bergman film to be shot by the great Gunnar Fischer - is an engaging satire on petit-bourgeois morals. The Devil suffers from an inflamed eye, which he informs Don Juan (Jarl Kulle) can only be cured if a young woman’s chastity is breached. So the legendary lover ascends from Hell and sets about seducing the innocent pastor’s daughter Britt-Marie (Bibi Andersson). Bergman’s dialogue bubbles with an irony reminiscent of his beloved Molière, and the music of Domenico Scarlatti (played by Bergman’s fourth wife, Käbi Laretei) underscores the joy that invests much of the film.

1976, Paramount, 136 min, Sweden/USA, Dir: Ingmar Bergman

After a prolonged stint in television, Bergman returned to the big screen with a decidedly dark film even by his standards, fusing such familiar themes as the troubles of marriage, mental illness and death. This intense drama tells the story of two psychiatrists (Liv Ullmann and Erland Josephson) bound by the institution of marriage and nothing more, as Ullmann’s tormented psyche gradually envelopes the film’s material reality to reveal a desperately lonely inner world. Featuring what Roger Ebert called “one of the greatest performances in an Ingmar Bergman film,” FACE TO FACE takes the legendary collaboration with Ullmann to bold new heights.

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