BABE
1995, Universal, 91 min, USA, Australia, Dir: Chris Noonan

“That'll do, pig.” This charming story of a pig who wants to be a sheepdog remains one of the most magical family films ever made. James Cromwell was never better than as Arthur Hoggett, a simple farmer who sees Babe’s potential and gives him a chance. Co-written and produced by George Miller (the MAD MAX mastermind, of all people), this heartwarming box office hit was nominated for seven Oscars, including a win for Best Visual Effects.


MUNSTER, GO HOME!
1966, Universal, 96 min, USA, Dir: Earl Bellamy

Fred Gwynne, Yvonne DeCarlo, Al Lewis and Butch Patrick reprise their TV roles (with newcomer Debbie Watson as the beautiful Marilyn) as the classic 1960s sitcom arrives on the big screen in color. The Munsters set sail to England after Herman inherits an estate there, but the British side of the family (including a delightful Terry-Thomas) will stop at nothing to hold on to Munster Hall. Costarring John Carradine and Hermione Gingold.


DORA OR THE SEXUAL NEUROSES OF OUR PARENTS
DORA ODER DIE SEXUELLEN NEUROSEN UNSERER ELTERN
2015, 90 min, Switzerland/Germany, Dir: Stina Werenfels

Mentally disabled Dora (Victoria Schulz) has spent much of her 18 years under psychotropic sedation. When her mother, Kristin (Jenny Schily), decides to stop the medication, Dora’s world opens and she begins a relationship with an unscrupulous perfume salesman (Lars Eidinger) eager to take advantage of her newfound lust for life. Dora’s parents are horrified by her relationship and eventual pregnancy, but are determined to both protect their daughter and allow her to make her own choices as an adult. In adapting Lukas Bärfuss’ challenging play, director Stina Werenfels and co-writer Boris Treyer emphasize the parallel struggles of both mother and daughter, examining broader issues of female sexuality and motherhood. Lukas Strebel’s camerawork earned a Cinelab Award for its innovative use of Dora’s point of view. In German with English subtitles.


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