1991, Sony Repertory, 144 min, USA, Dir: Steven Spielberg

Robin Williams stars as grown-up Peter Pan, now a businessman glued to his cellphone and woefully lacking a sense of magic or imagination, who is forced to face his Neverland past when his children are abducted by Captain Hook (a nefarious Dustin Hoffman). Steven Spielberg’s popcorn sequel of sorts to the J.M. Barrie classic is a rip-roaring good time, heightened by immersive set design and a colorful cast of prestige supporting players, including Julia Roberts as Tinkerbell, Bob Hoskins as Smee and Maggie Smith as Granny Wendy.

1981, Janus Films, 110 min, UK, Dir: Terry Gilliam

When 11-year old history buff Kevin discovers a time-and-space portal in his bedroom wall, a band of dwarves takes him on a series of rousing, funny and scary quests, where they meet Robin Hood, Napoleon and Agamemnon and search for "The Most Fabulous Object in the World." As the Chicago Reader's Dave Kehr pointed out at the time of its release, "All the hidden themes of the Disney films…are made brutally, and often hilariously, explicit. The film is resolutely, passionately anti-adult, yet much of the humor has an adult sophistication and edge to it; this is one kids' movie that doesn't condescend."

1988, Sony Repertory, 126 min, UK, Dir: Terry Gilliam

Terry Gilliam's third fantasy film (following TIME BANDITS and BRAZIL) is yet another terrific children's film that's just as entertaining (if not more so) for adults. The mythical Baron Munchausen (John Neville) materializes after a heinous performance of his life story, and sets off with pint-sized gamine Sally (Sarah Polley) to save a city in trouble, stopping off along the way for encounters with Oliver Reed, Eric Idle, Jonathan Pryce, Uma Thurman and Robin Williams as the Moon King. "The worlds Gilliam has created here are like the ones he created in his animations for Monty Python - they have a majestic peculiarity. And you're constantly amazed by the freshness and eccentricity of what is pushed in front of your eyes." -Hal Hinson, Washington Post.

Syndicate content