LAWRENCE OF ARABIA
1962, Sony Repertory, 216 min, UK / USA, Dir: David Lean

This sweeping epic of Arab infighting and British colonialism won seven Academy Awards including Best Picture. Director David Lean's masterpiece, lensed to perfection by Freddie Young and set to Maurice Jarre's majestic score, is based on the daring campaigns of real-life British military figure T.E. Lawrence during WWI. The amazing cast includes Peter O’Toole (in his first feature), Omar Sharif (in his first major English-speaking role as Sherif Ali), Anthony Quinn, Jack Hawkins, Claude Rains and Alec Guinness as Prince Feisal. Made to be seen on the big screen!


MCCABE & MRS. MILLER
1971, Warner Bros., 120 min, Dir: Robert Altman

Director Robert Altman spins fresh variations on archetypal themes and characters in a film that set the mood for 1970s revisionist Westerns. Memorable opening images of an unlikely hero riding toward town, accompanied by the music of Leonard Cohen, introduce this opium dream of a Western, starring Warren Beatty and Julie Christie, with superb cinematography by Vilmos Zsigmond.


DAYS OF HEAVEN
1978, Paramount, 95 min, Dir: Terrence Malick

Director Terrence Malick’s lyrical tone poem set at the turn of the 20th century tracks impoverished Chicago couple Richard Gere and Brooke Adams as they migrate to the Texas Panhandle and masquerade as brother and sister to find farm work. When their smitten, terminally ill boss (Sam Shepard) proposes to Adams, the couple see a way out of their poverty. But after the marriage, Shepard seemingly recovers, and tragic complications gradually unfold. Gorgeous, thoughtful and at times achingly romantic, this ambitious working-class epic set the standard for Malick’s future films - passionate, moody and serene meditations on the human condition set in a tragic dimension. Nestor Almendros won the Oscar for Best Cinematography. Co-starring Linda Manz.


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