OLD BOYFRIENDS
1979, Rialto Pictures, 103 min, USA, Dir: Joan Tewkesbury

Dianne Cruise (Talia Shire), a psychiatrist in the midst of an identity crisis and a doomed marriage, goes on a road trip to reconnect with boyfriends from her past in an effort to better understand herself. The men she encounters include Keith Carradine, Richard Jordan and John Belushi. Tewkesbury makes a charming directorial debut with this insightful drama penned by Leonard and Paul Schrader.


ALICE ADAMS
1935, Warner Bros., 99 min, USA, Dir: George Stevens

George Stevens left the world of B-movie comedies for A-list prestige fare with this heartfelt adaptation of Booth Tarkington’s novel. Katharine Hepburn gives one of her most subtle performances as an ambitious young woman seeking to escape her small-town background; although the character is superficially unappealing, Hepburn and Stevens allow the viewer to empathize with her in all her complexity. Solid supporting work from Fred MacMurray is an additional asset in this impeccably mounted drama. Co-starring Hattie McDaniels (GONE WITH THE WIND) and Fred Stone, who nearly steal the film.


MILLENNIUM ACTRESS
SENNEN JOYÛ
2001, Eleven Arts, 87 min, Japan, Dir: Satoshi Kon

When the legendary Ginei Studios shuts down, filmmaker Genya Tachibana and his assistant are tasked with interviewing its reclusive star, Chiyoko Fujiwara, who had retired from the spotlight 30 years prior. As she recounts her career, Genya and his crew are literally pulled into her memories where they witness her chance encounter with a mysterious man on the run from the police. Despite never knowing his name or his face, Chiyoko relentlessly pursues that man in a seamless blend of reality and memory that only Satoshi Kon could deliver. Boasting countless awards, MILLENNIUM ACTRESS is a must-see for anime fans of all ages.


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