THE ROARING TWENTIES
1939, Warner Bros., 106 min, USA, Dir: Raoul Walsh

Raoul Walsh burst onto the screen in his first Warner Bros. directorial outing with this sensational gangster tale starring James Cagney and Humphrey Bogart as World War I vets who return to an unwelcoming American society and head straight for the criminal life in a world of bootlegging and shady nightclubs. With a script from crackerjack Warner Bros. writing team Jerry Wald and Richard Macauley, and produced by the incorrigible erstwhile journalist Mark Hellinger, this picture bristles with suspense, smart-aleck humor and Walsh's great comic and dramatic timing. The triple threat of Cagney, Bogey and Walsh make for nonstop action and fun. A terrific round-up and look-back at the great Warner Bros. gangster yarns of the 1930s, this film says it all about how the studio kept in touch with the hard-knock life of the times. Also starring the inimitable Gladys George as Cagney's saloon-owning friend and Pricilla Lane as the woman who just can't love Cagney the way he wants. A blast of energy that is pure Walsh!


THE DEVIL-DOLL
1936, MGM Repertory, 78 min, USA, Dir: Tod Browning

Director Tod Browning and star Lionel Barrymore reunite for a bizarre tale of a prison escapee who shrinks humans to doll-size in order to execute a crime spree. Co-written by actor-director Erich von Stroheim!


TO CATCH A THIEF
1955, Paramount, 106 min, USA, Dir: Alfred Hitchcock

Retired cat burglar Cary Grant and ravishing American party girl Grace Kelly fall in love against a backdrop of fireworks, the French Riviera and a string of unsolved jewel robberies - all the while wearing some of Edith Head’s most stunning costumes. Alfred Hitchcock’s tongue-in-cheek soufflé, complete with surprisingly daring sexual innuendos for the time, is perfect escapist fare. With Charles Vanel (WAGES OF FEAR), Brigitte Auber.


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