Q: THE WINGED SERPENT
1982, 93 min, USA, Dir: Larry Cohen

Q is a winged resurrected Aztec deity decapitating New York citizens - and two-bit piano player Michael Moriarty knows just which skyscraper hides its nest. He intends to profit from the knowledge, much to the dismay of cops David Carradine and Richard Roundtree.


THE BREAKING POINT
1950, Warner Bros., 97 min, USA, Dir: Michael Curtiz

The finest film version of Hemingway’s novel To Have and Have Not (and yes, that includes the Bogart-Hawks classic) shifts the story from Cuba to Newport Beach, California, but retains the novel’s core of noir-stained tragedy. As Skipper Harry Morgan, John Garfield essays his finest screen portrayal of a man whose domestic travails and mid-life crisis results in crime, flight and death. Garfield’s turn is perfectly matched by Patricia Neal, as a predatory femme fatale, and Phyllis Thaxter as his beaten-down but unswervingly loyal spouse. With Wallace Ford as a bottom-feeding attorney and the great Afro-Cuban actor Juano Hernandez.


TANGERINE
2015, Magnolia Pictures, 88 min, USA, Dir: Sean Baker

Famously shot on iPhones with prototype anamorphic lenses, this decidedly modern holiday tale bursts off the screen with energy and style, defying expectations at every turn. It's Christmas Eve in Tinseltown and Sin-Dee (newcomer Kitana Kiki Rodriguez) is back on the block. Upon hearing that her pimp boyfriend (James Ransone) hasn't been faithful during the 28 days she was locked up, the sex worker and her best friend, Alexandra (newcomer Mya Taylor), embark on a mission to get to the bottom of the scandalous rumor. Their rip-roaring odyssey leads them through various subcultures of Los Angeles, including an Armenian family dealing with their own repercussions of infidelity. “An indie tour de force. … TANGERINE jumps off the screen and wows you like nobody's business.” - Peter Travers, Rolling Stone.


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