JUNIOR BONNER
1972, Walt Disney Co., 100 min, USA, Dir: Sam Peckinpah

Steve McQueen is Junior Bonner, a restless rodeo star trying to deal with his drifter-con man dad (Robert Preston) and outspoken, responsible mom (Ida Lupino), as well as girlfriend Barbara Leigh - when he’s not getting his head busted on bucking broncos. A sometimes funny, sometimes melancholy meditation on Americans who’ve forsaken the 9-to-5 strait jacket to thrive in a much more rugged lifestyle. With Ben Johnson and Joe Don Baker.


CONVOY
1978, MGM Repertory, 106 min, USA, Dir: Sam Peckinpah

For some strange reason, CB radios and long-distance truckers became all the rage in the late ’70s. When C.W. McCall’s country hit "Convoy" rocketed up the pop charts as well, the phenomenon took on a life of its own. Bill L. Norton (CISCO PIKE) wrote the screenplay for director Sam Peckinpah’s irascible action comedy about a trucker known as Rubber Duck (Kris Kristofferson), who, in league with his gal Melissa (Ali MacGraw), leads a rebellious convoy of like-minded drivers in protest against a brutally repressive sheriff called Cottonmouth (Ernest Borgnine). With Burt Young, Franklin Ajaye, Seymour Cassel.


AGE OF CONSENT
1969, Sony Repertory, 103 min, Australia, Dir: Michael Powell

James Mason is at his crotchety, hard-drinking best as Rabelaisian artist Bradley Morrison, sojourning on a remote isle off the Great Barrier Reef to try to jumpstart his dried-up muse. He finds inspiration unexpectedly in the form of nubile free spirit Cora Ryan (a delightful, gorgeous Helen Mirren in one of her earliest roles), an outspoken teenager living with her alcoholic harridan of an aunt (Neva Carr-Glynn). With a great turn by Jack MacGowran (CUL-DE-SAC, FEARLESS VAMPIRE KILLERS) as Mason’s ne’er-do-well friend and Harold Hopkins as Mirren’s smitten, wannabe beau. Mason’s character was based on painter Norman Lindsay, famous for his sumptuous paintings of voluptuous nudes in natural settings.


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