THE HAPPINESS OF THE KATAKURIS
KATAKURI-KE NO KÔFUKU
2001, 113 min, Japan, Dir: Takashi Miike

Whimsical musical numbers, grotesque horror and Claymation all come together in this wildly surreal film by one of the world’s greatest masters of blending genre. The Katakuri family open a bed-and-breakfast in the remote countryside but are met with misfortune when their guests start dying in spectacular fashion. Determined to prevent negative publicity from spoiling their new business, the Katakuris pile corpse after corpse in the backyard to keep up appearances.


VISITOR Q
BIJITÂ Q
2001, 84 min, Japan, Dir: Takashi Miike

Shot like a disturbing home video, Takashi Miike’s transgressive genre-bending portrait of a disturbingly dysfunctional family unit begins with a father’s attempt to document “young people today.” What follows is a descent into a household where incest, drug abuse and ultra-violence are all a part of daily life. Can the intervention of the mysterious stranger Q restore order to this bourgeois family? Equally disturbing, dark and funny, VISITOR Q is unlike anything you’ve seen before.


NEXT STOP, GREENWICH VILLAGE
1976, 20th Century Fox, 111 min, USA, Dir: Paul Mazursky

Writer-director Paul Mazursky takes a semi-autobiographical look at his days as an aspiring actor in 1950s New York in this engaging dramedy. Against the advice of his mother, fresh-faced Lenny Baker moves to Greenwich Village, where he falls in with a surrogate family of oddballs as he chases stardom. Along with such veteran performers as Shelley Winters, Lois Smith and Lou Jacobi, aspiring actor Bill Murray made his big screen debut in a brief, uncredited role here.


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