FIRST MAN
2018, Universal, 141 min, USA/Japan, Dir: Damien Chazelle

Oscar-winning director Damien Chazelle reteams with LA LA LAND star Ryan Gosling for the riveting story behind the first manned mission to the moon, focusing on Neil Armstrong and the decade leading to the historic Apollo 11 flight. Based on the book by James R. Hansen, this visceral and intimate account is told from Armstrong’s perspective, exploring the triumphs and the cost - to the astronaut, his family, his colleagues and the nation itself - of one of the most dangerous missions in history. With Claire Foy. "Damien Chazelle’s sweeping and intimate new film ... takes the conquest of difficulty as both theme and inspiration." - A.O. Scott, New York Times


CAN YOU EVER FORGIVE ME?
2018, Fox Searchlight, 106 min, USA, Dir: Marielle Heller

Melissa McCarthy stars in the adaptation of the memoir CAN YOU EVER FORGIVE ME?, the true story of best-selling celebrity biographer (and friend to cats) Lee Israel, who made her living in the 1970s and '80s profiling the likes of Katharine Hepburn, Tallulah Bankhead, Estee Lauder and journalist Dorothy Kilgallen. When Lee is no longer able to get published because she has fallen out of step with current tastes, she turns her art form to deception, abetted by her loyal friend Jack (Richard E. Grant). “It is a fiercely composed, historically informed, and richly textured film, as insightful regarding the particularities of the protagonist as it is on the artistic life - and on the life of its times.” - Richard Brody, The New Yorker.


THE BIG SHORT
2015, Paramount, 130 min, Dir: Adam McKay

In 2005, money manager Michael Burry (Christian Bale) is startled to discover highly rated mortgage bonds are based on delinquent home loans certain to default. As Wall Street bankers and government regulators ignore this ticking time bomb, Burry invents a financial instrument called the credit default swap in order to “short” the booming housing market. By the time things crash in 2008, he and a small group of contrarian investors (including Steve Carell, Ryan Gosling and Brad Pitt) will make billions yet will be forever changed by their experience, while millions of Americans lose their homes and the financial institutions responsible for the meltdown are bailed out by U.S. taxpayers.


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