TIME BANDITS
1981, Janus Films, 110 min, UK, Dir: Terry Gilliam

When 11-year old history buff Kevin discovers a time-and-space portal in his bedroom wall, a band of dwarves takes him on a series of rousing, funny and scary quests, where they meet Robin Hood, Napoleon and Agamemnon and search for "The Most Fabulous Object in the World." As the Chicago Reader's Dave Kehr pointed out at the time of its release, "All the hidden themes of the Disney films…are made brutally, and often hilariously, explicit. The film is resolutely, passionately anti-adult, yet much of the humor has an adult sophistication and edge to it; this is one kids' movie that doesn't condescend."


THE ADVENTURES OF BARON MUNCHAUSEN
1988, Sony Repertory, 126 min, UK, Dir: Terry Gilliam

Terry Gilliam's third fantasy film (following TIME BANDITS and BRAZIL) is yet another terrific children's film that's just as entertaining (if not more so) for adults. The mythical Baron Munchausen (John Neville) materializes after a heinous performance of his life story, and sets off with pint-sized gamine Sally (Sarah Polley) to save a city in trouble, stopping off along the way for encounters with Oliver Reed, Eric Idle, Jonathan Pryce, Uma Thurman and Robin Williams as the Moon King. "The worlds Gilliam has created here are like the ones he created in his animations for Monty Python - they have a majestic peculiarity. And you're constantly amazed by the freshness and eccentricity of what is pushed in front of your eyes." -Hal Hinson, Washington Post.


ABALLAY
ABALLAY: EL HOMBRE SIN MIEDO
2011, 100 min, Argentina, Dir: Fernando Spiner

Gaucho Aballay (Pablo Cedrón) brutally kills a man during a routine highway hold-up. When he sees the shattered and terrified look on the face of the murdered man's young son, Julián, hidden during the attack, Aballay resolves to change his criminal ways. Ten years later, the gaucho has become a mysterious local saint, forever mounted on a horse as penance for his earlier deeds. A grown-up Julián (Nazareno Casero) materializes in town seeking revenge for his father's death, with pictures sketched from his memory of the murderous culprits. Julián's relationship with his father's murderer becomes more complex than he bargained for when predatory psychopath El Muerto (Claudio Rissi) forces him to seek Aballay's protection. "An homage to both Argentina's gaucho culture and the brutal oaters of Sam Peckinpah and Walter Hill, ABALLAY is raw, surreal and memorable… broodingly intense, fierce and visually dazzling… Helmer Fernando Spiner brilliantly makes his point about the violence that underpins both Argentinean and American popular culture. " – Variety. In Spanish with English subtitles.


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