1961, Sony Repertory, 157 min, USA, Dir: J. Lee Thompson

Gregory Peck leads David Niven, Anthony Quinn, Stanley Baker, Anthony Quayle and James Darren on a perilous mission to destroy an enormous Nazi gun battery on the Greek coast. Partisans Irene Papas and Gia Scala lend their support behind enemy lines. Grueling and exhilarating, with some truly awe-inspiring suspense/action sequences. After EL CID, one of the most intelligent and human of the epic adventure spectaculars.

1986, Universal, 80 min, USA, Dir: Don Bluth

Young Russian mouse Fievel (voiced by Phillip Glasser) and his family are immigrating to America, a refuge they mistakenly think is cat-free, when he is separated from his parents and sister. Forced to fend for himself in a strange land that most certainly has a nasty feline presence, Fievel bands together with streetwise Italian mouse Tony (Pat Musick) and politically oriented Irish mouse Bridget (Cathianne Blore), and together the three concoct a fantastic plan to rid New York City of its cats once and for all. With the voice talents of Christopher Plummer as inspirational French pigeon Henri, and John Finnegan as the unscrupulous Warren T. Rat.

1982, Universal, 120 min, USA, Dir: Steven Spielberg

Arguably director Steven Spielberg’s most popular film, it follows several children (including Henry Thomas and a very young Drew Barrymore) who shelter and try to help a stranded alien back home to the stars. Magical and enchanting. With Dee Wallace Stone and Peter Coyote.

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