BEAT THE DEVIL
1953, Sony Repertory, 89 min, UK/Italy/USA, Dir: John Huston

If screwball comedies were about criminal entanglements instead of romantic ones - and if they featured dialogue by Truman Capote - they would resemble this delightful adventure spoof. Jennifer Jones plays a compulsive liar traveling to Africa with her husband when she meets Humphrey Bogart, who’s been enlisted by a group of criminals (including Robert Morley and Peter Lorre) eager to acquire a uranium mine. Bogart lost a bundle of money and several teeth making the film, but it remains among the most distinctive and entertaining of his career. Costarring Gina Lollobrigida.


INCEPTION
2010, Warner Bros., 148 min, USA/UK, Dir: Christopher Nolan

Dom Cobb (Leonardo DiCaprio) is the absolute best in the dangerous art of extraction: stealing valuable secrets from deep within the subconscious during the dream state when the mind is at its most vulnerable. Cobb’s rare ability has made him a coveted player in this treacherous new world of corporate espionage, but it has also made him an international fugitive. Now Cobb is being offered one last job that could give him his life back if he and his team can accomplish the near-impossible—not to steal an idea but to plant one. It would be the perfect crime … but the team faces a dangerous enemy that seems to predict their every move. Christopher Nolan’s meticulously constructed sci-fi thriller won 4 Oscars and features an all-star cast including Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Marion Cotillard, Ellen Page, Tom Hardy and Michael Caine.


THE RIGHT STUFF
1983, Warner Bros., 193 min, USA, Dir: Philip Kaufman

Sam Shepard, Scott Glenn, Ed Harris, Barbara Hershey, Dennis Quaid, Fred Ward and Jeff Goldblum head the stellar ensemble cast of THE RIGHT STUFF, which is based on Tom Wolfe’s best-selling book chronicling the exciting early years of the United States’ race to conquer the final frontier, and the daredevil test pilots who ultimately became the first Americans in space. Kaufman also wrote the screenplay for the film, which Pauline Kael of The New Yorker called “astonishingly entertaining and great fun.”


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