THE UNBEARABLE LIGHTNESS OF BEING
1988, Saul Zaentz Co., 171 min, USA, Dir: Philip Kaufman

Director Philip Kaufman’s sublime adaptation of Milan Kundera’s almost unfilmable novel, with Daniel Day-Lewis in one of his finest performances as Tomas, a free-spirit Czech doctor torn between the love of vulnerable Tereza (Juliette Binoche), whom he marries, and worldly Sabina (Lena Olin), as all three are caught in the turmoil of the 1968 Soviet invasion. Jean-Claude Carrière collaborated with Kaufman on the masterfully balanced screenplay. “What is remarkable about THE UNBEARABLE LIGHTNESS OF BEING … is not the sexual content itself but the way Kaufman has been able to use it as an avenue for a complex story, one of nostalgia, loss, idealism and romance.” – Roger Ebert, Chicago-Sun Times.


THE GREAT NORTHFIELD MINNESOTA RAID
1972, Universal, 91 min, USA, Dir: Philip Kaufman

Director Philip Kaufman’s gritty re-examination of the story of the Jesse James-Cole Younger gang and their disastrous assault on the town of Northfield, with Cliff Robertson and Robert Duvall heading an astonishing ensemble cast that includes Luke Askew, R.G. Armstrong, Matt Clark and Elisha Cook. A down-and-dirty Western refreshingly stripped of the usual reality-obscuring gloss.


THE WANDERERS
1979, Kino Lorber, 117 min, USA, Dir: Philip Kaufman

Director Philip Kaufman does a remarkable job of transferring Richard Price’s novel to the big screen, spotlighting the antics of an Italian-American teen gang in the Bronx in 1963. THE WANDERERS has evolved into a cult favorite over the years since its original release, with warm and funny performances from a fine ensemble cast including Ken Wahl, Karen Allen, John Friedrich and Linda Manz. A delight from beginning to end.


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