WORKING GIRL
1988, 20th Century Fox, 113 min, USA, Dir: Mike Nichols

This immensely likable look at one woman’s attempt to break through the glass ceiling features a near-unimprovable cast topped by Melanie Griffith as a secretary with big ideas, Sigourney Weaver as the boss who steals them and Harrison Ford as the man both have eyes for. A Cinderella story for the 1980s (complete with the decade’s focus on big business and even bigger hair), Nichols’ sure-handed romantic comedy picked up six Oscar nominations, including a win for Carly Simon’s original song “Let the River Run.”


POSTCARDS FROM THE EDGE
1990, Sony Repertory, 101 min, USA, Dir: Mike Nichols

Carrie Fisher adapted her semi-autobiographical best-seller about an actress (Meryl Streep) struggling to get her career back on track after a stint in rehab, and to come to terms with her mother (Shirley MacLaine), who had been a star herself a few decades earlier. Streep’s Oscar-nominated performance makes one wish she got more comedic roles and, as usual in a Nichols film, even the smaller parts shine, with Dennis Quaid, Gene Hackman, Richard Dreyfuss, Rob Reiner and Annette Bening among the supporting cast.


THE FORTUNE
1975, Sony Repertory, 88 min, USA, Dir: Mike Nichols

Sexier than the Marx Bros., handsomer than Laurel and Hardy but not as smart as the Three Stooges, hapless 1920s con men Warren Beatty and Jack Nicholson see big money in the person of sanitary-napkin heiress Stockard Channing, and they’re willing to stoop to marriage and murder to get it. With its offbeat characters and occasionally dark tone, this underrated gem is a favorite of Joel and Ethan Coen. “Manically scatterbrained … farce of a rare order.” - Vincent Canby, The New York Times.


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