PEEPING TOM
1960, Rialto Pictures, 101 min, UK, Dir: Michael Powell

Almost universally reviled by critics on its initial run, but now considered a masterpiece of psychological horror, PEEPING TOM all but killed Powell’s career when it was released. In an unforgettably creepy and affecting performance, Carl Boehm stars as a shy, gentle photographer, who is really a tormented serial killer filming his female victims at their moment of death. Boehm’s crush on boarding house tenant Helen (Anna Massey) brings on a crisis that can result only in redemption or destruction. Insightful and subversive, PEEPING TOM poses difficult questions about the universal desire for voyeuristic thrills and the very nature of watching film.


THE RED SHOES
1948, Park Circus/MGM, 133 min, UK, Dir: Michael Powell, Emeric Pressburger

A delirious, shimmering Technicolor dream of a movie, THE RED SHOES stars Scottish dancer-turned-actress Moira Shearer (in her film debut) as an aspiring ballerina caught between the maniacal, domineering passion of impresario Anton Walbrook and the equally-controlling love of composer Marius Goring. An awesome, superbly fluid blending of dance, a Golden Globe-winning score and Jack Cardiff’s Technicolor cinematography.


A CANTERBURY TALE
1944, MGM Repertory, 124 min, UK, Dir: Michael Powell, Emeric Pressburger

A beautifully told, and surprisingly intricate interweaving of the stories of four contemporary "pilgrims" - an American and a British soldier, a British "Land Girl," and a local magistrate/historian - in the village of Canterbury during World War II. A CANTERBURY TALE is filled with Powell and Pressburger’s marvelous, worldly humor - along with one of their most bizarre and disturbing characters in the form of the mysterious "Glue Man," pouring paste into the hair of young girls as they sleep! (Interestingly, Powell himself was born not far from Canterbury, and educated at King’s School there.) Starring Thomas Colpeper, Alison Smith and Bob Johnson.


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