SOMETHING WICKED THIS WAY COMES
1983, Disney, 95 min, USA, Dir: Jack Clayton

A strange carnival comes to a small town, bringing with it Mr. Dark (Jonathan Pryce), a sinister impresario who bewitches many of the town’s inhabitants with apparent answers to their dreams. Or is it their nightmares? Ray Bradbury adapted the screenplay from his novel.


THE INNOCENTS
1961, 20th Century Fox, 100 min, UK, Dir: Jack Clayton

Director Jack Clayton also directed British New Wave gems ROOM AT THE TOP and THE PUMPKIN EATER, but his most famous film remains this goosepimple-inducing, shuddery adaptation of Henry James’ classic ghost story, “Turn Of The Screw.” Deborah Kerr is a repressed governess who is convinced that the ghosts of the previous governess and the woman’s equally dead, cruel lover, Quint (Peter Wyngarde), haunt the mansion and grounds of her innocent young charges (Martin Stephens, Pamela Franklin). Reality, superstition and warped psychology collide in this riveting, brilliantly photographed jewel of a film (lensed by future horror director Freddie Francis).


THE GREAT GATSBY
1974, Paramount, 144 min, USA, Dir: Jack Clayton

“Gone is the romance that was so divine.” Director Jack Clayton (THE INNOCENTS) directs Francis Ford Coppola's screenplay adaptation of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s classic novel about the tarnished and tragic American dream, Robert Redford excels as the ill-fated, hopelessly determined Jay Gatsby, while Mia Farrow plays the sweet but poisonous Daisy Buchanan, with Bruce Dern as her bullying husband, Tom. Theoni V. Aldredge received an Oscar for her glittering 1920s costume design, while Nelson Riddle received an Oscar for Best Original Score.


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