DARK PASSAGE
1947, Warner Bros., 106 min, USA, Dir: Delmer Daves

In this third collaboration between Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall, Bogie plays Vincent Parry, a man wrongly accused of murdering his wife who breaks out of jail to find the killer; Bacall is the woman who helps him hide out and solve the mystery. Working from David Goodis' bleak crime novel, director Delmer Daves employs an innovative subjective camera to adopt Bogart's point of view and creates a minor noir classic.


HOLLYWOOD CANTEEN
1944, Warner Bros., 124 min, USA, Dir: Delmer Daves

Some of Warners’ biggest stars turn out to do their part for the war effort in this delightful romantic comedy inspired by the nightspot created to entertain servicemen during WWII. Robert Hutton plays a GI on leave in L.A. for a week with a fellow soldier; when he becomes the club’s millionth customer, he wins a date with the actress of his dreams, Joan Leslie. The Andrews Sisters, Jimmy Dorsey and His Orchestra and Roy Rogers (with Trigger in tow) are among the musical performers, Jack Benny, Joe E. Brown and Eddie Cantor supply comic relief, and an army of movie greats like Bette Davis and John Garfield (who together founded the real-life Hollywood Canteen) play themselves. They really don’t make ‘em like this anymore!


THE BADLANDERS
1958, Warner Bros., 85 min, USA, Dir: Delmer Daves

Ernest Borgnine gives one of the most intense performances of his career as John McBain, a hardened criminal who collaborates with fellow ex-con Alan Ladd on a daring gold robbery. This Western remake of THE ASPHALT JUNGLE is a riveting heist film and a visually sumptuous period piece.


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