A SHOT IN THE DARK
1964, MGM Repertory, 99 min, Dir: Blake Edwards

Blake Edwards’ follow-up to THE PINK PANTHER is a non-stop barrage of pratfalls, sight gags and linguistic nonsense, courtesy of Inspector Clouseau (Peter Sellers). Everything seems freshly minted, from Herbert Lom’s hysterics as Chief Inspector Dreyfus to Burt Kwouk’s first appearance as Cato.


THE PINK PANTHER
1964, Park Circus/MGM, 113 min, Dir: Blake Edwards

Writer-director Blake Edwards introduced Peter Sellers’ absolutely clueless Inspector Jacques Clouseau with this comedy about a British jewel thief and playboy (David Niven) on a ski holiday with nephew Robert Wagner, mistress Capucine, exotic princess Claudia Cardinale and a priceless diamond in tow.


EXPERIMENT IN TERROR
1962, Sony Repertory, 123 min, Dir: Blake Edwards

Lee Remick is a bank teller whose teenage sister (Stefanie Powers) is kidnapped by creepy, asthmatic Ross Martin (Artemus Gordon on TV’s "The Wild, Wild West"), a sociopathic crook brewing an extortion plot. Glenn Ford is the no-nonsense FBI agent who steps in after a terrified Remick contacts the agency. Director Blake Edwards demonstrates his skill at creating dark atmosphere and nail-biting suspense, honed on "Peter Gunn," the TV show he created. After BREAKFAST AT TIFFANY’S and THE PINK PANTHER (both Edwards films), composer Henry Mancini graces us with his most memorable (and sinister) score.


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