FAMILY PLOT
1976, Universal, 120 min, USA, Dir: Alfred Hitchcock

Hitchcock’s dazzling, masterful and overlooked final film follows a phony medium (Barbara Harris) and a dim-witted cab driver/out-of-work actor (Bruce Dern) who cross swords with a ruthless, duplicitous criminal couple (William Devane and Karen Black). Greed, kidnappings, jewel heists and car chases ensue.


TOPAZ
1969, Universal, 143 min, US, Dir: Alfred Hitchcock

Director Alfred Hitchcock delves deeper into the world of Cold War espionage he’d plumbed in TORN CURTAIN, adapting this thriller from Leon Uris’ fact-based novel about the 1962 Cuban missile crisis. When a defector reveals the Soviet plan to install nuclear missiles in Cuba, the CIA turns to French spy André Devereaux (Frederick Stafford) to gather intelligence. Complicating his work is a cadre of French double-agents codenamed “Topaz.” With Michel Piccoli and Philippe Noiret.


YOUNG AND INNOCENT
THE GIRL WAS YOUNG
1937, BFI, 83 min, UK, Dir: Alfred Hitchcock

Charged with murder, young Robert Tisdall (Derrick De Marney) figures he’s better able to prove his innocence on the run than in court; joining him on his quest for exoneration is the police chief’s equally fresh-faced daughter (Nova Pilbeam, the kidnapped teen in THE MAN WHO KNEW TOO MUCH and utterly beguiling here). The climactic crane shot revealing the real killer is justly famous.


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