THE SEA WOLF
1941, Warner Bros.,, 100 min, USA, Dir: Michael Curtiz

The definitive cinematic version of Jack London’s famed novel returns to the big screen. Edward G. Robinson’s magnificent portrayal of Wolf Larsen is the centerpiece of a darkly fatalistic tale adapted by Robert Rossen (ALL THE KING’S MEN, THE HUSTLER) who blends a distinctive anti-Nazi sentiment (initiated into American movies by the brothers Warner) with an unforgettable saga of tyranny at sea. An all-star cast of John Garfield, Ida Lupino, Gene Lockhart and Barry Fitzgerald add dramatic heft to Curtiz’s brilliantly helmed epic.


NOW, VOYAGER
1942, Warner Bros., 117 min, USA, Dir: Irving Rapper

“Don't ask for the moon - we have the stars.” In this classic Bette Davis soap opera, the great actress plays a repressed spinster who finds love with Paul Henreid after psychiatrist Claude Rains encourages her to stand up to her domineering mother and to embrace life. Max Steiner's Oscar-winning score provides just the right amount of emphasis in this manipulative but undeniably effective, intelligent Hollywood sudser. “…a highly narcotic, swoon-inducing romance in the Bette Davis canon.” - Jeremiah Kipp, Slant Magazine


ARSENIC AND OLD LACE
1944, Warner Bros., 118 min, USA, Dir: Frank Capra

Theatre critic Mortimer (Cary Grant) discovers on his wedding day that his beloved maiden aunts are serial killers of lonely old bachelors, and that insanity runs in his family. Just when he believes things can’t get any worse, his psychotic criminal brother (Raymond Massey) returns in the dead of night with his alcoholic plastic surgeon sidekick (Peter Lorre). A classic Capra black comedy!


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