THE SCARLET HOUR
1956, Paramount, 95 min, USA, Dir: Michael Curtiz

Nearing the end of his legendary career, Michael Curtiz produced and directed this intricately plotted L.A.-based crime thriller headed by a cast of new discoveries. A tony seductress (Carol Ohmart) and her lover (Tom Tryon) overhear plans for a jewel robbery, and believe the scheme will be their deliverance from Ohmart’s possessive husband (James Gregory). Highlights include a guest appearance by Nat King Cole singing “Never Let Me Go” in the Crystal Room of the Beverly Hills Hotel. Culled from the Paramount vault, this 35mm print remains one of the least seen film noirs of the 1950s, featuring Curtiz’s use of the then-new Fujinon camera lens. You’ll only see this at NOIR CITY!


THE TURNING POINT
1952, Paramount, 85 min, USA, Dir: William Dieterle

Prosecutor Edmond O’Brien leads a government probe into a crime syndicate headed by sinister Ed Begley, but he’s hamstrung by pervasive political corruption. Crusading reporter William Holden agrees to assist - while he and O’Brien vie for the attention of a loyal Alexis Smith. The hard-edged script (based on an unpublished novel by Horace McCoy) is a real-life lift from the Kefauver Committee’s exposé of organized crime on the national level. Bunker Hill, Angel’s Flight and Olympic Auditorium all accentuate the period realism. Co-starring Tom Tully, Ted de Corsia and Ray Teal. Presented in a new digital restoration by Paramount Pictures, created specifically for NOIR CITY!


THE BLUE DAHLIA
1946, Universal, 96 min, USA, Dir: George Marshall

Hard-luck WWII vet Alan Ladd returns to Los Angeles only to become the prime suspect in the murder of his two-timing wife (Doris Dowling). Fortunately, plucky Veronica Lake is around to help him navigate the twists and turns of Raymond Chandler’s Oscar-nominated screenplay. Ladd is accompanied by his faithful dogface pal William Bendix and a pre-Ward Cleaver Hugh Beaumont. An exquisite time capsule of 1940s L.A. hardboiled style, featuring the impeccable wardrobe stylings of Edith Head. Script by Raymond Chandler.


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