RED HEADED WOMAN
1932, Warner Bros., 79 min, USA, Dir: Jack Conway

The legendary Jean Harlow delivers a star-making performance in this provocative pre-Hayes Code comedy as a charming gold digger who sleeps her way to fortune. Secretary Lillian Andrews sets her sights on her boss, eventually luring him away from his happy marriage to his childhood sweetheart. But instead of making a big splash in society, she is rejected. After casting her attention on a coal king, Lillian realizes that she loves her French chauffeur (Charles Boyer). The film is often cited as one of the motion pictures that brought about more stringent censorship.


THE ASPHALT JUNGLE
1950, Warner Brothers, 112 min, Dir: John Huston

The kingpin of caper films, featuring one of the best ensemble casts ever. Director John Huston's neo-realist adaptation of W. R. Burnett’s novel examines the ambitions of small-time hoods and brought a new level of empathy and authenticity to crime - that "left-handed form of human endeavor." Famous as the film that introduced Marilyn Monroe, THE ASPHALT JUNGLE deserves renewed recognition as a crucial work of noir Americana. With Sterling Hayden, Louis Calhern, James Whitmore and Jean Hagen.


ON THE TOWN
1949, Warner Bros., 98 min, USA, Dir: Gene Kelly, Stanley Donen

Gene Kelly, Frank Sinatra and Jules Munshin are three sailors on leave in New York who find romance - and plenty of song and dance - with Vera-Ellen, Ann Miller and Betty Garrett over the course of their day at liberty in the big city. The creative team of Kelly and Donen, producer Arthur Freed and writers Adolph Green and Betty Comden would reunite three years later to make SINGIN’ IN THE RAIN.


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