THE ASPHALT JUNGLE
1950, Warner Brothers, 112 min, Dir: John Huston

The kingpin of caper films, featuring one of the best ensemble casts ever. Director John Huston's neo-realist adaptation of W. R. Burnett’s novel examines the ambitions of small-time hoods and brought a new level of empathy and authenticity to crime - that "left-handed form of human endeavor." Famous as the film that introduced Marilyn Monroe, THE ASPHALT JUNGLE deserves renewed recognition as a crucial work of noir Americana. With Sterling Hayden, Louis Calhern, James Whitmore and Jean Hagen.


ON THE TOWN
1949, Warner Bros., 98 min, USA, Dir: Gene Kelly, Stanley Donen

Gene Kelly, Frank Sinatra and Jules Munshin are three sailors on leave in New York who find romance - and plenty of song and dance - with Vera-Ellen, Ann Miller and Betty Garrett over the course of their day at liberty in the big city. The creative team of Kelly and Donen, producer Arthur Freed and writers Adolph Green and Betty Comden would reunite three years later to make SINGIN’ IN THE RAIN.


MADAM SATAN
1930, Warner Bros., 116 min, USA, Dir: Cecil B. DeMille

This delightfully bizarre mélange of song, dance, bedroom farce and airship disaster - director Cecil B. DeMille’s only movie musical - must be seen to be believed. Angela Brooks (Kay Johnson) endures the infidelity of husband Bob (Reginald Denny) until a masquerade ball offers her the opportunity to win back her straying spouse and put the man’s mistress (Lillian Roth) in her place. A pre-Code gem whose sets, production numbers and costumes (by designer Adrian) will leave you slack-jawed!


Syndicate content