THE AGE OF INNOCENCE
1993, Sony Repertory, 139 min, USA, Dir: Martin Scorsese

Director Martin Scorsese visits New York City’s Gilded Age in this rich adaptation of the Edith Wharton novel. Upper class lawyer Newland Archer (Daniel Day-Lewis) is engaged to marry May Welland (Winona Ryder) when May’s cousin, the Countess Ellen Olenska (Michelle Pfeiffer), arrives from Europe. While the Countess’ desire to leave her husband invites gossip, Archer’s growing attraction to this free-thinking woman could prove even more ruinous. Meticulously crafted in every regard, from Joanne Woodward’s narration to Gabriella Pescucci’s Oscar-winning costume design, this is among Scorsese’s most underrated films.


FRANKENWEENIE
2012, Walt Disney Pictures, 87 min, USA, Dir: Tim Burton

This stop-motion animated salute to the 1931 classic FRANKENSTEIN is based on a live-action short that director Tim Burton made while working at Disney in the 1980s. When his dog Sparky is hit by a car, young Victor Frankenstein (Charlie Tahan) puts his science lessons to work, reanimating the deceased pet - the first of many creatures unleashed when the boy’s classmates copy his work. With Catherine O’Hara, Martin Short, Martin Landau and Winona Ryder. An Oscar nominee for Best Animated Feature.


ALIEN RESURRECTION
1997, 20th Century Fox, 109 min, USA, Dir: Jean-Pierre Jeunet

Against all odds, Ellen Ripley lives. Brilliantly brought (back) to life in Joss Whedon’s clever and haunting screenplay, Ripley once again battles one of American cinema’s great monsters, discovering in the process that she herself has undergone a shocking acidic change.


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