JEWEL ROBBERY
1932, Warner Bros., 68 min, USA, Dir: William Dieterle

William Powell (THE THIN MAN films) stars as a debonair thief who steals both gems and hearts in this romantic crime comedy based on the play "Ekszerrablás a Váci-uccában" by Ladislas Fodor. Bored Baroness Teri von Horhenfels (Kay Francis) is on the prowl for a new lover when she witnesses a jewelry store robbery and decides the head of the gang (Powell) will be her next prey. She casts aside her current amour, but her husband (Henry Kolker) will not surrender so easily: He dedicates himself to putting The Robber behind bars.


TAKE ONE FALSE STEP
1949, Universal, 94 min, Dir: Chester Erskine

William Powell makes his only foray into ’40s film noir as a married college professor whose reacquaintance with a wartime fling (Shelley Winters) takes a bad turn when she disappears under suspicious circumstances. Marsha Hunt plays the gal-pal who tries to help Powell - the prime suspect - solve the crime and salvage his reputation. There’s more comedy than usually found in noir - as audiences still expected from the man who embodied the legendary Nick Charles. James Gleason and Sheldon Leonard are the cops pursuing Powell through Los Angeles locations lensed by the great Franz Planer (CRISS CROSS).


LIBELED LADY
1936, Warner Bros., 98 min, USA, Dir: Jack Conway

Remade a decade later as EASY TO WED, this screwball comedy gem features a veritable dream team of MGM stars at the top of their game. Heiress Myrna Loy sues the New York Evening Star when it paints her as a home-wrecker, but editor Spencer Tracy thinks he can get the suit dropped by trapping the wealthy woman between one of his ex-reporters (William Powell) and his own fiancée (Jean Harlow). Powell’s hilarious fishing sequence is but one of the many highlights.


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