THE RAZOR’S EDGE
1946, 20th Century Fox, 145 min, USA, Dir: Edmund Goulding

A young man returns from World War I and searches for the meaning of life while surrounded by his unhappy and more materialistic friends. Based on the novel of the same name by W. Somerset Maugham, this was Tyrone Power's first film after his return from WWII. It was to serve as a signal to him that the head of the studio, Darryl F. Zanuck, was going to allow him to do more serious roles. The signal proved false. Also starring Gene Tierney, Clifton Webb, John Payne and Anne Baxter (who won a Best Supporting Actress Academy Award). THE RAZOR'S EDGE was the biggest grossing film for 20th Century Fox in 1946 and nominated for three other Oscars, including Best Picture.


NIGHTMARE ALLEY
1948, 20th Century Fox, 110 min, USA, Dir: Edmund Goulding

An ambitious carnival barker (Tyrone Power) moves from a mind-reading act with carny veteran Zeena (Joan Blondell) to performing the same act in an upscale nightclub with his new, ex-carny wife (Coleen Gray). He consequently becomes involved in scamming a wealthy man with the help of a duplicitous psychiatrist (Helen Walker). Widely regarded today as a classic noir thriller, NIGHTMARE ALLEY was Power's own project and gave the actor his best role. He was up to the task, delivering the greatest performance of his career. Unfortunately, his boss, Darryl F. Zanuck, panicked when he saw the leading man he had so carefully made into a superstar playing a low-life. He gave the film no publicity, never pushed the film or actors for any awards and quickly withdrew it from circulation. The film was ahead of its time – its grit and cynicism are perfect for today's audience.


WITNESS FOR THE PROSECUTION
1957, MGM Repertory, 114 min, USA, Dir: Billy Wilder

Accused murderer Tyrone Power (in his final film) is defended by ailing barrister Charles Laughton in Billy Wilder's dark, delightful courtroom nailbiter. Marlene Dietrich as Power's duplicitous spouse helps supply one of the most insane, out-of-left-field twists in any mystery.


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