THE MIDNIGHT STORY
1957, Universal, 89 min, USA, Dir: Joe Pevney

A San Francisco motorcycle cop (Tony Curtis) becomes obsessed with solving the murder of his mentor, a popular North Beach priest. Not allowed to follow his suspicions, he chucks his badge and becomes an undercover vigilante. The prime suspect, a popular Italian patriarch (Gilbert Roland), ends up loving him like his own son. But is he guilty of murder? The San Francisco locations are accentuated by atmospheric black-and-white Cinemascope.


INSIGNIFICANCE
1985, Hanway Films, 109 min, UK, Dir: Nicolas Roeg

This adaptation of Terry Johnson’s play brings together four of the most iconic personalities of the 20th century in a thought-provoking meditation on fame, power and the unknowability of the human soul. As she is filming a movie in New York City, Marilyn Monroe (Theresa Russell) visits Albert Einstein (Michael Emil) as Joe DiMaggio (Gary Busey) and Senator Joe McCarthy (Tony Curtis) circle around them. Roeg’s non-linear approach to the story opens fascinating windows into the characters of the actress, the professor, the ballplayer and the senator, and this speculative drama earned the Technical Grand Prize at the 1985 Cannes Film Festival.


FLESH AND FURY
1952, Universal, 83 min, Dir: Joe Pevney

Tony Curtis delivers a knockout performance as a deaf boxer who looks to be easy pickings for a mercenary blonde (Jan Sterling) while a compassionate reporter (Mona Freeman) tries to prevent him from being counted out for good. Bernard Gordon’s crisp script and a solid supporting cast (including the debut of Harry Guardino) bolsters Curtis’ early starring turn.


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