WHO AM I THIS TIME?
1982, SpectiCast, 53 min, USA, Dir: Jonathan Demme

Shy hardware store clerk Christopher Walken becomes a different person when performing in local theater; new arrival Susan Sarandon is cast opposite him in “A Streetcar Named Desire” without realizing that his Stanley Kowalski is just an act. This production for TV’s “American Playhouse” series was adapted from a Kurt Vonnegut short story and features music by John Cale.


ARBITRAGE
2012, Roadside Attractions, 107 min, USA, Dir: Nicholas Jarecki

Billionaire hedge-fund manager Robert Miller (Richard Gere) is caught making illegal deals by a business partner and has just days to balance his books to avoid jail time. In addition, Miller is in the midst of a cat-and-mouse game with a detective (Tim Roth) investigating him for covering up the accidental killing of his mistress. ARBITRAGE is both a tense, edge-of your-seat thriller (think Bernie Madoff meets MATCH POINT) and a complex character study expertly executed by Gere.“Mr. Gere is one of cinema's great walkers, graced with a suggestively predatory physical suppleness, and he slips through the movie like a panther. He's the film's most deluxe item.” - Manohla Dargis, New York Times.


THE HUNGER
1983, Warner Bros., 97 min, USA, Dir: Tony Scott

Twenty years before anyone had ever heard of TWILIGHT, director Tony Scott was bringing impossibly glamorous bloodsuckers to the big screen. Catherine Deneuve and David Bowie star as a pair of upscale New York vampires who draw geriatrics researcher Susan Sarandon into their circle when age begins to catch up with one of them. “I must say, there's nothing that looks like it on the market,” remarked Bowie on release, and the film's rich sense of atmosphere inspired a cult following and a TV series. Watch closely for a performance by goth music icons Bauhaus, and one of Willem Dafoe's first movie roles.


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