JOE (1970)
1970, Park Circus/MGM, 107 min, USA, Dir: John G. Avildsen

A low-budget indie film shot over a month and a half in the winter of 1970, JOE traces the adversarial relationship between a white-collar father (Dennis Patrick) and his hippie daughter (a debuting Susan Sarandon). After a confrontation with her grungy partner (Patrick McDermott), the traumatized patriarch winds up at a bar, where he befriends working-class Joe (Peter Boyle), who is a fount of caustic barbs against the counterculture. The pair bond and set out on an odyssey that concludes in nightmarish carnage at a rural commune. Re-editing the film around Boyle's performance and even releasing a soundtrack album devoted to his diatribes, original distributor Cannon not only made JOE box-office gold, but turned Boyle himself into a star.


WHO AM I THIS TIME?
1982, SpectiCast, 53 min, USA, Dir: Jonathan Demme

Shy hardware store clerk Christopher Walken becomes a different person when performing in local theater; new arrival Susan Sarandon is cast opposite him in “A Streetcar Named Desire” without realizing that his Stanley Kowalski is just an act. This production for TV’s “American Playhouse” series was adapted from a Kurt Vonnegut short story and features music by John Cale.


ARBITRAGE
2012, Roadside Attractions, 107 min, USA, Dir: Nicholas Jarecki

Billionaire hedge-fund manager Robert Miller (Richard Gere) is caught making illegal deals by a business partner and has just days to balance his books to avoid jail time. In addition, Miller is in the midst of a cat-and-mouse game with a detective (Tim Roth) investigating him for covering up the accidental killing of his mistress. ARBITRAGE is both a tense, edge-of your-seat thriller (think Bernie Madoff meets MATCH POINT) and a complex character study expertly executed by Gere.“Mr. Gere is one of cinema's great walkers, graced with a suggestively predatory physical suppleness, and he slips through the movie like a panther. He's the film's most deluxe item.” - Manohla Dargis, New York Times.


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