THE BRIBE
1949, MGM [Warner Bros.], 98 min, USA, Dir: Robert Z. Leonard

Less a coherent drama than a sweaty fever-dream of ’40s film noir, THE BRIBE features an all-star cast (Robert Taylor, Ava Gardner, Charles Laughton, Vincent Price, John Hodiak) trapped on the steamy Caribbean isle of “Carlota” (as only MGM’s art department could render it), perspiring through a convoluted tale of romance, disease and WWII contraband. Skip the logic and wallow in the exotic artifice of this sublime noir fantasia, directed by Robert Z. Leonard, photographed by the great Joe Ruttenberg and scored by the magnificent Miklos Rozsa!


HIGH WALL
1947, MGM [Warner Bros.], 99 min, USA, Dir: Curtis Bernhardt

“So tense! So taut! It closes in on you like a high wall!” Quintessential postwar noir! Brain-damaged vet Robert Taylor confesses to murdering his unfaithful wife and is sentenced to a sanitarium. His doctor (sexy Audrey Totter) gradually realizes he might not be guilty. Taylor gives his best performance ever in this neglected gem, which combines a classic “wrong man” scenario with an intriguing take on the psychic scars suffered by wounded WWII veterans.


CAMILLE
1936, Warner Bros., 109 min, Dir: George Cukor

Lovely Parisian courtesan Marguerite (the smoldering, sensuous Greta Garbo) must choose between the prickly Baron de Varville, who's elevated her from a life of poverty to luxury, and handsome Armand (Robert Taylor), even as her health begins to deteriorate due to tuberculosis. Garbo received an Oscar nomination for Best Actress for her devastating performance.


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