HOLLOW TRIUMPH
1948, Eagle-Lion, 83 min, Dir: Steve Sekely

Fugitive crook Johnny Muller (Paul Henreid) finds the perfect hiding place - in the guise of a psychiatrist who is his identical twin … almost. One of the sublime examples of noir fatalism, with a clever script that will keep you guessing - and the added attraction of an amazingly evocative look at 1940s Los Angeles, photographed by the great John Alton. This was the first film produced by romantic leading man Henreid, who like many actors in the late 1940s turned to crime dramas to revitalize their careers. Costarring Joan Bennett at her snarly best.


DECEPTION
1946, Warner Bros., 115 min, Dir: Irving Rapper

Aspiring pianist Christine Radcliffe (Bette Davis) is reunited with her lover, cellist Karel Novak (Paul Henreid), whom she feared had died in a Nazi concentration camp. Unfortunately, she’s now the mistress of renowned composer Alexander Hollenius (Claude Rains), who is as creative manipulating human emotions as he is conducting an orchestra. Featuring a soaring score by the legendary Erich Wolfgang Korngold. Lovers of classical music will be swept away by the rapturous music; lovers of classic Hollywood will relish the arch tête-a-tête between Bette Davis and, at his vitriolic best, the incomparable Claude Rains.


NOW, VOYAGER
1942, Warner Bros., 117 min, USA, Dir: Irving Rapper

“Don't ask for the moon - we have the stars.” In this classic Bette Davis soap opera, the great actress plays a repressed spinster who finds love with Paul Henreid after psychiatrist Claude Rains encourages her to stand up to her domineering mother and to embrace life. Max Steiner's Oscar-winning score provides just the right amount of emphasis in this manipulative but undeniably effective, intelligent Hollywood sudser. “…a highly narcotic, swoon-inducing romance in the Bette Davis canon.” - Jeremiah Kipp, Slant Magazine


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