BONNIE AND CLYDE
1967, Warner Bros., 111 min, USA, Dir: Arthur Penn

Arthur Penn’s New Hollywood masterpiece follows the criminal exploits of Bonnie Parker (Faye Dunaway), Clyde Barrow (Warren Beatty) and the rest of the Barrow gang in the Depression-era Midwest. With Gene Hackman, Michael J. Pollard, Gene Wilder and Estelle Parsons (a Best Supporting Actress Oscar winner as Blanche Barrow).


ENTER LAUGHING
1967, Sony Repertory, 112 min, USA, Dir: Carl Reiner

Carl Reiner's first feature is an astonishingly assured debut, with a visual polish (thanks largely to veteran cinematographer Joseph Biroc) and a deep sense of personal expression (it was based on Reiner's autobiographical novel of the same name). Reni Santoni plays a young Jewish man who dreams of becoming a comedian during the Depression. Needless to say, his parents think that working in the family drugstore is a safer bet. Even in this early film, Reiner shows his skill at casting secondary roles, with a supporting cast that includes Shelley Winters, Elaine May, Jose Ferrer, Jack Gilford, Janet Margolin and Michael J. Pollard.


ROXANNE
1987, Sony Repertory, 107 min, USA, Dir: Fred Schepisi

Steve Martin was never better than as long-nosed Colorado fire chief C.D. Bales in this sparkling update of Cyrano de Bergerac. Daryl Hannah is the titular beauty who catches the eye of a rookie fireman (Rick Rossovich) reliant on Bales’ way with words for his love letters to her. Martin penned the screenplay to this charming romantic comedy, among the best of the 1980s - the film’s barroom challenge to devise 20 nose jokes is just one example of the writer-star’s razor-sharp wit.


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