TEEN WOLF
1985, MGM Repertory, 91 min, USA, Dir: Rod Daniel

Nerdy teenager Michael J. Fox finds that the usual growing pains of puberty are a little more extreme for him than for other kids - he's a werewolf! Luckily, becoming a lycanthrope turns out to be just the thing he needs to attain popularity at school in this ’80s comedy favorite.


BACK TO THE FUTURE PART III
1990, Universal, 118 min, USA, Dir: Robert Zemeckis

Robert Zemeckis reunites his posse for this, the final installment, which sets off with McFly (Fox) receiving a 100-year-old letter from Doc Brown (Lloyd), who is now happily living in the Wild West of 1885. Some historical snooping reveals that Brown was to be killed a mere week after penning his missive! Time to reignite the DeLorean, hidden in an abandoned mine, save his partner and get back to the future; but it won’t be easy, what with gasoline as scarce as it was in '85, and their nemesis Sheriff Buford "Mad Dog" Biff Tannen (Thomas F. Wilson) hot on their tail. And if that’s not enough, Doc has to go and fall in love with a schoolmarm (Mary Steenburgen). Set in the American West of 1950s television (but with ZZ Top!), the third installment in the trilogy successfully maintains the SFX wizardry and warm sentiment of the first two box-office hits.


BACK TO THE FUTURE PART II
1989, Universal, 108 min, USA, Dir: Robert Zemeckis

Rather than rest on their laurels, Robert Zemeckis and writing partner Bob Gale completely reinvented the BACK TO THE FUTURE franchise with this audacious follow-up. In a bit of experimentation worthy of the French New Wave, Michael J. Fox and Christopher Lloyd return for a sequel that spends most of its running time not before or after the original story but at the same time. A series of time-travel complications sends hero Marty McFly and partner Doc Brown back to the 1955 of the first film, after a mishap in 2015 generates a parallel universe. Even more elaborately plotted than the original, this highly ambitious sequel allows Zemeckis more opportunities for witty satire and cutting-edge special effects.


Syndicate content