1994, Warner Brothers, 124 min, Dir: Alan Rudolph

Jennifer Jason Leigh gives one of her greatest performances as the brilliantly bitchy, emotionally tormented Dorothy Parker in writer-director Alan Rudoph’s wonderful, sardonic portrait of the legendary Algonquin Round Table of the 1920s. With superb supporting work by Campbell Scott as Parker’s platonic soulmate Robert Benchley, Matthew Broderick as love-’em-and-leave-’em writer Charles MacArthur, and a virtual who’s who of up-and-coming talent including Lili Taylor (as a hilariously-butch Edna Ferber), Gwyneth Paltrow, Peter Gallagher, Jennifer Beals, Martha Plimpton and Nick Cassavetes.

1986, Paramount, 103 min, USA, Dir: John Hughes

If you ever wanted to know how to fake illness, revive your neurotic best friend (Alan Ruck), get your girlfriend (Mia Sara) out of school, hack your academic record or anything else that will get you out of something you don’t want to do, this is the movie for you! Matthew Broderick reigns as the king of slacker cool in Hughes’ classic teen comedy, twisting and shouting his way across Chicago.

1983, MGM/Park Circus, 114 min, USA, Dir: John Badham

Gentlemen, please: no video-gaming in the war room. For Matthew Broderick's seminal teen computer hacker, coming of age, saving the world and getting Ally Sheedy mean accidentally triggering World War III (and causing big headaches for the likes of Dabney Coleman and Barry Corbin). Director John Badham's tale of a boy, his modem and Armageddon is as suspenseful - and unnerving - as ever. With a score by Arthur B. Rubinstein.

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