THE NARROW MARGIN
1952, Warner Bros., 71 min, USA, Dir: Richard Fleischer

This film always receives its share of votes as one of the finest noirs ever made - and the spiciest of its many ingredients is the unforgettable Marie Windsor. She and co-star Charles McGraw trade priceless purple putdowns as he ferries her on the rails from Chicago to L.A., where she’s scheduled to testify in a racket-busting trial. Plenty of switchbacks along the way, rendered with maximum punch and pace by director Richard Fleischer and producer Stanley Rubin. Also starring Jacqueline White.


HELL’S HALF ACRE
1954, Paramount, 91 min, USA, Dir: John Auer

This wonderfully trashy Steve Fisher yarn concerns a woman (Evelyn Keyes) who heads to Hawaii in search of her husband (Wendell Corey), believed killed in the Pearl Harbor attack. Her only clue? A hit record with lyrics he’d written to her! Keyes is spunky and irresistible, as is Elsa Lanchester (as a gabby cabbie). The great Marie Windsor is the slatternly wife of a drunken sleaze (Jesse White). Filmed on location in Honolulu’s notorious red-light district. Don’t miss Tiki Noir on the big screen! Also starring Nancy Gates, Philip Ahn and Keye Luke.


THE KILLING
1956, Park Circus/MGM, 83 min, Dir: Stanley Kubrick

Kubrick’s tough-as-nails heist film about a robbery at a racetrack features an incredible rogue’s gallery of great character actors, including Sterling Hayden, Coleen Gray, Elisha Cook Jr., Marie Windsor and Timothy Carey. One of the most entertaining crime films ever made, propelled by Kubrick’s no-nonsense approach and screenwriter Jim Thompson’s biting, chiseled-in-stone dialogue.


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