BUY ME THAT TOWN
1941, Universal, 70 min, Dir: Eugene Forde

This Runyonesque rarity tells the tale of a gaggle of New York gangsters (led by the redoubtable Lloyd Nolan) who, after getting popped for speeding through a small Connecticut town, hatch a plan to turn the sleepy burg into a resort for rusticating racketeers. Not noir by a long shot, but the script is more prescient than its writers could ever have imagined (did Bugsy Siegel see this movie?). DP Theodor Sparkuhl lends his always evocative camerawork to this rambunctious B gem, enlivened by the marvelous mugs of Albert Dekker, Sheldon Leonard and Edward Brophy.


CIRCUMSTANTIAL EVIDENCE
1945, 20th Century Fox, 68 min, USA, Dir: John Larkin

Lloyd Nolan plays a noble postman trying to save a father (Michael O’Shea) accused of killing the grumpy SOB who roughed up his young son. A deep roster of B-movie stalwarts gives life to this creaky, preachy but hugely entertaining warning about the dangers of “circumstantial evidence.” Directed by John Larkin. NOT ON DVD


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